English football fans injured in Lyon pub attack

My report on euronews from yesterday

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Egyptian PM seeks Israel-Palestine ceasefire

You can see the video for this article on the euronews website here

The Egyptian Prime Minister has denounced Israel’s attacks on Gaza and says Cairo will try to secure a ceasefire.

Hisham Qandil paid a three-hour visit to the Palestinian territory on Friday, visiting the Council of Ministers building as well as a hospital treating those wounded by the attacks.

Cross-border fighting continued during the visit.

Egypt, which signed a peace treaty with Israel in 1979, has brokered informal truces between Israel and Palestinian militants in the Gaza strip before.

The government of Egypt, which is seen as ideologically close to Hamas, now has to balance solidarity with the fellow Islamists with the country’s dependence on US aid, worth around 1.6 billion euros per year.

Qandil says Egypt seeks the establishment of a Palestinian state with Jerusalem as its capital.

EU summit in ‘small revolution’

You can see the video for this story on the euronews website here

European leaders have agreed a deal on a banking union.

France and the European Commission arrived at the summit keen to run ahead with a new European bank supervisory mechanism to be in place by January, but the cautious German chancellor, Angela Merkel said she thinks baby steps are needed first: “Concerning the move towards banking supervision, we have decided to move forward with the principle that quality is more important than rapidity. This means we will not have a working banking supervision at the beginning of 2013.”

The summit agreement now says that “work on the operational implementation will take place in the course of 2013” rather than in January.

European Council President, Herman Van Rompuy hailed the result of the summit as highly successful: “This is a small revolution, it means that we’ll have only one supervisor for the whole Europe, who – to a certain extent – will replace all the national supervisors.

“You know the source of our problem is the financial crisis. Now we will have only one supervisor for Europe, if we had this in 2008 I don’t think the crisis would have reached this level.”

The art of compromise has prevailed once again in Europe, but there is still much more that needs to be done, as the Spanish and Greek emergencies are still waiting.

Russian opposition leader detained

You can see the video for this story on the euronews website here

Russian opposition leader Sergei Udaltsov has was led away by police on Wednesday morning, as authorities began criminal proceedings against him, and other associates, for planning “mass disorder” in protests against President Vladimir Putin.

The charges focus on allegations, made in a pro-Kremlin documentary, which claims Udaltsov received money and orders to cause mass unrest in Russia, from an ally of Georgian President Mikeil Saakashcili. The charges carry a jail sentence of up to 10 years.

The head of the investigation committee, Vladimir Markin, gave a warning to protest leaders:

“I would like to warn all of those who think that one can organise without consequences, massive disorders and terror attacks that threaten the life and health of civilians in our country. You don’t imagine how professional our special services are,and you don’t know our laws and our penal code.”

Udaltsov who has led a series of protests sanctioned by Moscow denies the allegations against him.

His supporters say the Kremlin is conducting a politically motivated crackdown on protest leaders.

Uganda family planning

In Uganda today family planning is at the top of the agenda. At the moment there are 34 million citizens but the country has one of the fastest growing populations anywhere in the world. On average each woman will give birth to six children.

In villages and communities people gather to listen the presenters of Heart Radio Uganda. Their talk show discusses family planning, covering topics such as contraceptive injections, condoms and how to avoid teenage pregnancy.

IFA Berlin: Eye-controlled TV and more

The IFA in Berlin is one of Europe’s top electronic show, and offers us an idea of what we can expect to see in our living rooms in the future.

Among the many new technologies on display was a state of the art television presented by Chinese company Haier that the viewer can control with a glance.

Eye tracking technology has already been tested for some years, but this TV – according to the manufacturer – is quite innovative. It allows users to change channel and alter the volume simply by moving their eyes. Furthermore, the viewer is able to scroll through text or menus while watching a programme.

Christophe Chancenest, TV Marketing Manager for Haier, said: “The difference compared to the past is that this technology is very intuitive, very fast. Obviously we are working on additional capabilities, including the ability to scroll text at the desired speed by the viewer. In the future, we would like to integrate this technology into a pair of glasses, for example, which will be able to hold a small device that today, in the demo, is placed on the table.”

Energy efficiency is one of the key aims of new technologies and Miele came up with an innovation of its own. They noted that many consumers use a lot of softener in their washing machines with the added purpose of making their clothes smell nice.

This is not only not very ecological but often the scent doesn’t survive the heat of a tumble dryer. For this reason German manufacturer, Miele, presented a new kind of dryer which takes vials containing natural fragrances, so with just a small amount of liquid the clothes stay smelling fresh for up to four weeks.

There was also a very bright little camera on show, the DSC-RX100 from Sony. Despite its small size it has a very powerful sensor which is able to take pictures in extremely low light.

Myanmar: Government worsens sectarian violence

You can see the video for this story on the euronews website here.

Myanmar security forces committed rape, and mass arrests against Rohingya Muslims in June according to a new Human Rights Watch report.

It said the attacks happened after forces had already stood by during an outbreak of sectarian violence between Muslims and Buddhists in Arkan State, which resulted in dozens of deaths and many villages destroyed.

Phil Robertson, the Deputy Director of Watch’s Asia Division, said that many lives would have been saved if government forces intervened from the outset:

“What was consistent in this narrative was that there was a government failure to intervene, and that meant that the people from the both sides began to arm to defend themselves. And ultimately, a lack of government protection meant that emboldened partisans on both sides more thoroughly planned and executed coordinated attacks on the other side. So in rather short order, the situation descended to chaos.”

The report entitled: ‘The Government could have stopped this,’ also says that over 100,000 Rohingya Muslims have been displaced and are in need of food, shelter and medical care after the government restricted humanitarian aid.